Would ya just look at it?
Would ya just look at it?
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chutchsaysdealwithit:

supplyside:

United States’ Lockheed P-38 Lightning fighters over France in 1944

Or as some people call it, “Galaga.”
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klarizewatchesmovies:

favorite scenes: the interrogation of Monsieur LaPadite from Inglourious Basterds (2009)

At a certain point he brings out this pipe, and what pipe does he bring out, it’s the Sherlock Holmes pipe. One, you could say it’s a sexual thing: ‘my pipe is bigger than yours’ and the other thing you could say is ‘I know you’re lying and I got you.’ So maybe he doesn’t smoke a pipe at all, it’s simply just an interrogation technique to send the farmer to hell. It’s simply an act of theatre. - Quentin Tarantino [source]
klarizewatchesmovies:

favorite scenes: the interrogation of Monsieur LaPadite from Inglourious Basterds (2009)

At a certain point he brings out this pipe, and what pipe does he bring out, it’s the Sherlock Holmes pipe. One, you could say it’s a sexual thing: ‘my pipe is bigger than yours’ and the other thing you could say is ‘I know you’re lying and I got you.’ So maybe he doesn’t smoke a pipe at all, it’s simply just an interrogation technique to send the farmer to hell. It’s simply an act of theatre. - Quentin Tarantino [source]
klarizewatchesmovies:

favorite scenes: the interrogation of Monsieur LaPadite from Inglourious Basterds (2009)

At a certain point he brings out this pipe, and what pipe does he bring out, it’s the Sherlock Holmes pipe. One, you could say it’s a sexual thing: ‘my pipe is bigger than yours’ and the other thing you could say is ‘I know you’re lying and I got you.’ So maybe he doesn’t smoke a pipe at all, it’s simply just an interrogation technique to send the farmer to hell. It’s simply an act of theatre. - Quentin Tarantino [source]
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pokec0re:

rocket twirl darker image. by chrisgrohusko on Flickr.
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projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
projecthabu:

This A-12 #06938 was covered in a previous post. Click here to view.
     A-12 #06938, on display at the USS Alabama Battleship Museum, is shown along side a pristine J-58 engine with less than an hour test run time, and a very worn landing gear tire. Because the landing gear had to fit in such a low aspect ratio wing, they had to be extremely compact. For the small landing gear to support the enormous landing weight of the 52,000 lb aircraft, the tires were inflated to 415 Psi with nitrogen. Comparatively, your car tires are probably inflated to somewhere around 40 Psi.
     The skin of the aircraft heated up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit in flight. To keep the tires from melting, they were constructed from aluminium powder and latex, which gave the tires their distinctive silver color. If the tires were pressurized with air, they would have exploded under such intense heating. Thus, the tires are inflated with nitrogen.
     Because of the high tire pressure, if the aircraft ran over any debris, the tire would cut rather than give. This had the potential to cause a mission abort before the aircraft even left the ground. To avoid tire damage, a car driven by the mobile crew (backup crew) preceded the aircraft everywhere it went on the ground searching for FOD (foreign object debris). It drove along the taxi way in front of the aircraft and down the length of the takeoff roll down the runway runway before each flight. Regardless, each tire was replaced after just 10 flights. Each tire cost $2,000.
     The final two photos in the set were shot with my cell phone camera. It’s important to remember that the photographer makes the photo. Not the camera.
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cartoonpolitics:

 “Student loans are destroying the imagination of youth. If there’s a way of a society committing mass suicide, what better way than to take all the youngest, most energetic, creative, joyous people in your society and saddle them with, like $50,000 of debt so they have to be slaves? There goes your music. There goes your culture. There goes everything new that would pop out. And in a way, this is what’s happened to our society. We’re a society that has lost any ability to incorporate the interesting, creative and eccentric people.” ~David Graeber
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